Amongst the Reflections:

Experiencing New England’s fall foliage a different way

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         When one thinks of fall in New England, the word foliage often follows, and for good reason. If you have beheld the sight for yourself, the word evokes memories of spectacular arrays of (unbelievably) natural colors that encompass the landscape and console the spirit… along with a thermos of warm cider, of course. In annual celebration of this natural rite, many leaf strewn trails are hiked, hills ascended, wool hats and mittens adorned, and fires tended.

         There are countless paths that lead to the experience of autumn in New England, some less traveled than others. And while popular mountain roads become crowded, many equally verdant (and often less expensive) opportunities remain blissfully obscure. One such obscurity is beautifully obvious: Vermont’s ever flowing, lulling rivers. 

        During these early fall months; rivers such as the Connecticut absorb the painted, mountainous expanse into their glassy sheen, refracting an ethereal double. Views such as these are stunning enough in person and photo alike. Though, it is not until you traverse the surface of these waters that the mesmerizing quality of immersion captivates. Such an experience can hardly bring one closer to the nature of autumn itself.

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         Along the banks of the Connecticut River can be found another hidden gem, one which parallels none other: The Path of Life Garden. This one of a kind garden is no ordinary arrangement of flowers tucked into the woods. The Path of Life Garden is a landscape shaped by a revelation of the human spirit and inspired by our relationship with the natural world.

         Visitors travel through 18 works of art illustrating elements that constitute human life. In doing so, spectator is transformed into participant, engaging the 14 acres of sculptures and the surrounding expanse. Accented by the Connecticut River, the Path of Life Garden accommodates hiking, picnicking, and unique camping opportunities. Staying overnight in one of the two authentic Native American tipis is a fall favorite.

         As the leaves adorn their festive pageantry, another chapter in the path of life ends and another begins.  So whether it’s a stroll on a riverside path or a float down the gentle river, come give us a visit at GreatRiver Outfitter’s and the Path of Life Garden in Windsor, Vermont.

         And while you’re here, don’t forget to enjoy all the activities in the area! Harpoon Brewery has one of the widest selections of fine microbrews in the region. Vermont Farmer’s Cupboard makes available only the finest local and sustainable Vermont food products. Watch artisans create ceramics and hand blown glass at Simon Pearce. Visit our website for more information about us and others in our area.

By John Bayles

www.GreatRiverOutfitters.com